Meet the Tribe: Artists and Performers of UxI IV: Unite the Tribes!

We are SO excited to share space with some incredible artists, performers, and storytellers at UxI IV: Unite the Tribes! If you haven’t snagged tickets yet, you can purchase them right here. See you there! And now, introducing our tribe:

FEATURED VISUAL ARTISTS

Champoy by Sophia Kandell

champoy (born Janeil Sumampong Lim) is an LA-based artist born and raised in Bukidnon, a province in the Southern Philippines. His drawings are heavily influenced by comix infused with abstracted organic patterns and humorous images lifted from his personal cosmology and culture shock. IG: @champchampchampoy

Secola_MSP1Keith Secola belongs to the Northern Ute and Anishinaabe Nations. He received his BFA in painting with a focus on silkscreen printing from the Institute of American Indian Arts in 2012.  Finding a balance between contemporary life and tradition, he created a blend of images, prints, sculpture, and installation derived from oral storytelling, urban life, and Native America to communicate his work.

Atenio Nyar Kasagam is a Pan-Africanist Sangoma and Urban farmer whose motherland is in the Nam lolwe Lake Basin, at the source of the River Nile. She lives in and experiences Detroit as a black mecca, the land where she was born into a woman, and a mother of 3 African American children. She is committed to the the practice and embodiment of black magic as a strategy for aliveness, staying connected with her lineage, and harnessing power and knowledge to co-create a more abundant future.

Lehua M. Taitano, a native Chamoru from Yigo, Guåhan (Guam), is a queer writer and interdisciplinary artist.  She is the author of two volumes of poetry: Inside Me an Island (WordTech Editions, forthcoming 2018) and A Bell Made of Stones (TinFish Press). Taitano currently serves as the Community Outreach Coordinator on the Executive Board of the Thinking Its Presence: Race, Literary and Interdisciplinary Studies Conference.

Lisa Jarrett (Portland, OR) is an artist and educator. Her intersectional practice considers the politics of difference within a variety of settings including: schools, landscapes, fictions, racial imaginaries, studios, communities, museums, galleries, walls, mountains, mirrors, floors, rivers, and lenses. She exists and makes socially engaged work within the African Diaspora.

Natani Notah is an interdisciplinary artist, poet, and graphic designer. She is an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation (Diné) and is also of Lakota and Cherokee descent. Inspired by acts of decolonization, Indigenous feminism, and Indigenous futurism, her work explores contemporary Native American identity through the lens of Diné womanhood.

img_20180608_113551_551.jpgSeneca Kern For the past 10 years, Seneca has worked building gardens for homes, schools, and common spaces. Centered on self-reliance and community revitalization, his work brings home our most local, organic, sustainable food. He’s also incorporated natural jewelry to heal traumas around land and farming for people of color. IG: @ohhhSoIL

Screen Shot 2015-08-22 at 5.28.15 PMnatamwe integrates the medicinal practices of Kotodama (the spirit of words), Reiki and acupuncture, Taiko drumming, and filmmaking to shape spaces for us to remember/imagine right relationship with land and spirit. She is a recipient of the Glimmer Train Short Story Award, and has writing published in AK Press’ “Rebellious Mourning: The Collective Work of Grief”. IG: @natamawe

SHOWCASE VISUAL ARTISTS

Eva Grant is an indigenous storyteller who lives and studies in the heart of Muwekma Ohlone territory, erroneously referred to as the Bay Area. Their short stories, poems, plays, and films speak of identity, memory, and the ever-changing nature of home. IG: @soeur_du_mal

G. A. Aishwarya Vardhana is a Bay Area based visual artist and writer. Working in digital art, drawing, installation and photography, Vardhana combines south Asian art forms with modern technology. Her work bridges contemporary concerns with centuries-old cultural histories to reveal generational and cultural signifiers to a younger generation. IG: @shweeze

kayan_mugshot.jpgKayan Cheung-Miaw As a cartoonist, Kayan aims to humanize those who have been dehumanized. As an organizer, Kayan’s leadership for the Yank Sing restaurant workers’ campaign resulted in a historic $4 million settlement for 280 workers. As an educator, Kayan uses art to teach critical thinking, empathy, and social justice. KayanComics.com

Lynn Luzano Bryant was raised in a Filipino community of artists in Salinas Valley, California and a Filipino Balikbayan since the age of 7. The art she creates now seeks to merge and express the fusing and interpretation of her cultural experience. Contact lynnbryant@gmail.com to dream up new things to build

Morgan Johnson: I am an artist and like to capture authentic moments. The more transparent, the better​. I try to recreate the essence of the emotions, energy and mood in the picture. I’ve only been doing photography for a short time, but I love it and want to grow in it.

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Kaitlyn Evangelista: I’m Kaitlyn, a Filipina from the Tenderloin. I gained inspiration to use art as an outlet because I grew up having a difficult time loving my brown skin because of the world’s shame. From there I taught myself how to paint, to free myself and learn to

Kristian Kabuay was born in the Philippines and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.  He spent his college years in the Philippines where he honed his knowledge about the native ancient writing system, Baybayin. Kristian is a self-taught artist influenced by calligraphy, graffiti, abstract art, indigenous culture, technology and Asian writing systems. IG: @baybayin | FB: kristiankabuay

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Cristine Blanco is a Bay Area visual artist. Her current practice explores the physical and psychological properties of water. Understanding water as a transformative, healing practice and as a limited resource. Cristine’s most recent work has been included in Brown Girl Surf (OAK) and Sea Sick in Paradise (LA). IG: @cblanco

Audrey Mei Yi Brown is a writer who recently graduated from UCLA. In her work, she tries to find language to tell the stories of entangled social, environmental and political geographies that surround her. She is interested in how language can help radically (re)imagine a more equitable world.

Annakai 早川 Geshlider watches words scrape / lift / sway / stick / smash / rot / prank / feed. a fan of gabbing, silence, bittermelon, & jokes, she wonders: when old words won’t do the trick, then what? how to sprout, cross out, unmake? wonder: how to remember, plus forget? wonder: how can word: move through breath, limb? wonder: scrap all that: what’s left ta say?

20180510_121913.jpgDiana Li is an artist and arts organizer. As an artist, she works with video, performance and installation, experimenting with technology to channel intergenerational transmissions of memory and knowledge from the ether-nets of her mixed diasporic background. She is a founding member of Appendix Collective and cultivates joy with SoMapagmahal. IG: @art.dianali

Chris Marin: I am showing both the idea of truly showing the interaction of the private and public life. My work runs a narrative of what it means to be a man through the enlightenment of acknowledging and coming to an understanding of recent American History.

fcac_war_texta_images-jodyhaines-6912-1.jpgTextaQueen unweaves influences of cultural and colonial legacies on politics of gender, race, sexuality and identity. Best known for intricate felt-tip portraiture created in collaborative process with other ‘othered’, diasporic and displaced folks, her current practice examines her own existence as a person of Indian origin living on others’ ancestral lands. IG & FB: @TextaQueen

anna_glinoga.jpgAnna GlinogaI is currently working for the Commission of Filipino Language (Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino KWF). This project that she is involved with aims to document the dying culture of indigenous people and/or communities in the Philippines. She had the opportunity to work for Pilipinas HD – a medium through which the Filipino is Educated and Celebrated through fact based and credible story telling documentaries on Philippine culture. IG: @ankrnmg

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Louisa Songco is a young Pilipinx artist from Los Angeles, CA. She hopes that her art can showcase the beauty of Pilipinx culture and connect her audience. IG: @chichailou

Maya Fuji Born in Japan and raised in the Bay Area, Maya’s art is inspired by both her cultural heritage as well as the local cultures of the SF Bay Area. Her work explores themes of traditional Japanese folklore within the context of modern day society and pop culture. Each piece has a story to tell– historical legends, lessons and ghost stories of the “Ukiyo (floating world)” era, reimagined through the lens of the digital age. Social media handle: @fuji1kenobe

Charles Philippe Jean-Pierre is a Caribbean American Artist with indigenous roots.  He’s an American University Art professor and U.S. State Department Artist. He’s exhibited with the Asian Pacific American Smithsonian and his intersectional work, which centers on population and space, is currently on display at the International Monetary Fund.

Michael Viduya IG: @hapandtap

PERFORMING ARTISTS

Boondock Squad is a hip-hop and rock band whose music is for the people of the boondocks– the masses, the outliers, those in the margins, and the sections in society whose truths need to be heard. They are comprised of J.Theo on vocals, Rodel on vocals and keys, Fonzzilla on the turntables, Mhyck on guitar, Allen on bass, and Mykho on drums. facebook, instagram, twitter: @boondocksquad | boondocksquad@gmail.com

Daniel Arizmendi (AKA Snowflake Towers) is an indigenous artist of Tzeltal Mayan (Chiapas, MX) and Yaqui (Sonora, MX/Arizona) heritage.

Javier Stell-Fresquez is a performance provocateur originally from El Paso (Tigua & Piru Native American, Xican@). Follow her latest project about motherhood, queerness, and toxicity on Facebook @MotherTheVerb

headshot_alejoe_uxi2018.jpgErina Alejo approaches their multidisciplinary practice as an artist, activist-scholar, educator and community organizer through an ethnographic framework rooted in people power. Alejo is a founding member of Appendix Collective, formed through their 2016 Asian American Women Artist Association (AAWAA) Emerging Curator Fellowship with Diana Li. Establishing SoMapagmahal Photography Mxntorship Program in 2017 with a team of artists of color reactivates the critical joy cultivated by youth of color in SoMa Pilipinas Filipino Cultural Heritage District. Alejo has shown work at and collaborates with AAWAA, Southern Exposure, Filipino Mental Health Initiative-SF, Kearny Street Workshop, Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Center, {m}aganda Magazine and The Pilipinx American Library. Erina is a third generation renter and lives with family in Excelsior, SF, documented through their @ahxstoryofrenting Instagram project. IG: @discobangus

Dåkot-ta Alcantara-Camacho represents intertwined lineages experiencing dislocation from homeland, tradition, and language yet persist through spiritual magic slowly revealing itself through building relationships with indigenous cultural practicioners across the planet. I develop a spiritual consciousness to journey with the ancestors through hip hop, movement, and sound composition.

Joy Cosculluela Somatic educator and performing artist, Joy is artistic director of Wayfinding Performance Group, a multicultural ensemble in SF.  She created dance theatre works “Homing Devices” and “All that Remains,” and presented at NOH Space, Z Below, Foolsfury Festival, among other events. Joy explores Filipinx immigrant themes against backdrop of decolonization. Wayfindingperformance.com

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Molly Olis Krost is a Bay Area based, Filipina, bi-racial playwright currently pursuing her MFA at SFSU. She holds two B.A.’s from UC Berkeley. Molly’s plays have been performed in Zellerbach Hall and Durham Studio Theater. Her writing has been published in {m}aganda magazine. Twitter: @mllykrst | IG: @molly.o.k

krisha hernández is an embodiment of Mexica/Aztec, Yaqui (Yoeme), Bisayan ancestors— a queer Indígena, storyteller, scholar, poet, and ph.d. candidate. they are a teaching fellow in the department of anthropology at uc santa cruz, a researcher in the indigenous science, technology, and society hub/lab created by dr. kim tallbear, and writes with the creatures collective. IG: @writingcomadre

IMG-1696.JPGKAPWA.VES is a creative and energy worker. Her heart centered oral artistry is used to inspire soulful movements and free thinking. Accompanying her is TAYO–  meaning “US” or “We” in the Filipino language. TAYO is a circle of diverse artists united by the spirit of KAPWA (togetherness) and guided by their shared ancestors to support each other’s growth and self expression through rhythm and sound. In union with the mic, we vibrate truths imprinted in our hearts and minds to resonate with the collective.  This is US. We are ONE. 

gfm.jpgGet Free began as a term of endearment, used to encourage decompression and freedom through the cultivation of dance, visual art, poetry and music. Get Free develops a solidarity of art embodying personal triumph, deep struggle and worldly innovation of creative ideas. IG: @getfree_movement

A Stage of Our Own (ASOO) is a Philippine and Pacific Island collective of artists, organizers, educators, and researchers, creating contemporary works centered on womxn’s experiences. We are based in Tongva territory, also known as Los Angeles. IG: @astageofourown

Toni Temehana Pasion is a dancer, curator, and teaching artist. Toni’s creative processes  are informed by her hula, Philippine, ori Tahiti, contemporary dance, and writing practices. As a teaching artist in various elementary schools, she works towards expanding culture-based education through dance. Toni is the founder and producer of A Stage of Our Own.

Abe Lagrimas, Jr. is a musician, composer, educator, and author who studied at Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. He competed in the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Drums Competition and continues to be an in-demand session musician. Abe is a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award recipient and has released multiple albums in the United States, Japan, and Korea. His book Jazz Ukulele: Comping, Soloing, Chord Melodies is available in stores worldwide and on Amazon.

Leilani Banday is a Tongva territory based artist taking strides for truth, beauty and indigenous recognition. Also a mother of two boys, Leilani draws inspiration from the wisdom that parenthood provides as well as her experience as an Island Womb*an. Leilani is a multi-disciplinary Pasifika Filipina artist with A Stage of Our Own.

Leah Ramos is originally born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio. She received her BFA in Ballet at the University of Cincinnati. She has performed with companies in Florida and Ohio. Leah currently resides in Los Angeles where she continues to dance and video edit. Leah is half Filipino and half Korean. She is a dancer with Kayamanan Ng Lahi and an artist with A Stage of Our Own.

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Indigenous Protocol | Workshop Recap

January 27, 2018

This weekend, the Urban X Indigenous team and community members traveled two hours south of the Bay Area to spend a sunny Saturday on sacred indigenous land, 15 miles south of Hollister, CA — Indian Canyon.

Indian Canyon Welcome SignIndian Canyon is the only land continuously held by the Ohlone people, the first inhabitants of the San Francisco and Monterey Bay Areas. Nestled in the Gavilan mountain range, it is the only federally recognized “Indian Country” along coastal Northern California from Santa Barbara to Sonoma. According to the Indian Canyon website, the land has served as a safe haven for indigenous peoples since the 17 and 1800s. Today, the land continues to serve indigenous communities by providing land for those performing ceremonies (offering 30-40 areas for individual prayer and ceremony). Indian Canyon is also a site for research, exchange, and reflection.

We made the trip to honor an invitation extended by Kanyon Sayers-Roods (Costanoan Ohlone and Chumash), who was raised by her mother, Ann-Marie Sayers, in Indian Canyon, their ancestral land. Kanyon is an artist, poet, published author, activist, and teacher within the Native community. Given her drive to foster conversations around decolonization and reindigenization, our team was honored to collaborate with her for this month’s UxI workshop on Indigenous Protocol.

Burden Basket

The tone for the day was set within feet of driving onto the property, where visitors were greeted with an “Imaginary Burden Basket,” giving us all the opportunity to leave behind our burdens, and enter Indian Canyon in our best, most peaceful spirits. As the workshop began, Kanyon gathered the attendees into a circle at the Indian Canyon Arbor and Village house foundation.

A bundle of California White Sage was passed around for smudging, while we each made our own introductions, sharing our origins, stories, appreciations, and hopes. The introductions made it evident that we were in multicultural, inter-tribal, and inter-generational company, as multilingual prayers were shared in the presence of elders, and curious youth as young as 2 years old. It was here in this circle that Kanyon told us more about the history of Indian Canyon, and introduced us to different aspects of Indigenous Protocol. She reflected on her own experiences learning protocol, sharing stories of her mother, and of ceremonies she attended and participated in growing up.

From there, Kanyon walked our workshop-goers about 30 yards from our starting point, to introduce us to the Healing Pole. The Healing Pole, carved by Pacific Islander Shane “Tonu” Eagleton, was given to the Ohlone in 1997 as part of the Kohola Project, which was focused on healing across cultures and religions. Many of us took a moment to touch, hold, and embrace the Healing Pole, some leaving an offering in exchange. Beside it, the Canyon’s Spirit Rock is currently adorned with abolone shells, which were set with the intention to heal the declining abolone populations of coastal California. Walking back up the hill,  we visited Indian Canyon’s Cultural Center, created and maintained by Costanoan Indian Research (CIR) Inc. The CIR, co-founded by Anne-Marie Sayers, is a nonprofit organization that exists to support the educational and cultural conservancy work at Indian Canyon.

Our time at Indian Canyon was educational, empowering, and, in some ways, nearly ethereal. One of our workshop goers found himself nearly speechless at the undeniable atmosphere in the Canyon. “You can feel it, in the air, in the trees around us,” he described, “The energy here is.. it’s special. Unlike anything I’ve ever felt.” That energy has certainly coursed through the soil of Indian Canyon for centuries, cultivated by the land’s indigenous ancestors. Today, that energy continues to be nurtured by the CIR, caretakers of the land, community members, volunteers, educators, and students who seek to honor this safe haven, it’s history, and it’s future.

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A special thank you to our facilitator, Kanyon Sayers-Roods, for educating us on indigenous protocol, and the story of Indian Canyon. And of course, thank you to all who made the drive out to attend the workshop!

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One Love and All Love,

UxI

UxI: Unite the Tribes: CALL FOR PERFORMANCE SUBMISSIONS!

 

Calling all performing artists! From dancers, to poets, to emcees — we are looking for artists to perform at the SOMArts Bay Gallery for URBAN x INDIGENOUS IV.

UxI IV: Unite the Tribes seeks to re-commune, reconnect, and reorganize our urban indigenous family.  We are looking for performances that challenge the forces that attempt to divide us, that speaks to the power of uniting in the face of adversity. How do we reclaim our belonging to our lands, to our ancestors, and to each other? How do we unite across the borders that have been created for us to re-envision how we live together, how we resist together, and how we shape the future for our generations yet to come? Can we achieve a way of solidarity that still embraces our differences?

As UxI enters our fourth year, we seek to create a space for engagement between art and artists of different mediums. As such, we ask that performers develop their pieces in a way that responds to this year’s Featured Conversations (shown below). The Featured Conversations are visual artworks that exceptionally reflect the vision of Unite the Tribes. They embody themes we are exploring in this year of UxI: healing through community and collective decolonization; exploring our relationship to the lands to which we are indigenous and on which we are settlers; revitalizing indigenous creative practices; joining together in movements to protect our land and communities; and recognizing intertwined histories and struggles in solidarity. We are looking for proposals for performances that address these themes. Proposals are strongly encouraged to respond directly to a specific Featured Conversation and may incorporate an installation’s physical as well as conceptual qualities.

THE FEATURED CONVERSATIONS:

Sagradong Pyramid by Champoy, Nicanor Evangelista, & Diyan Bukobomba

Sagradong Tatsulok

Installation of palm leaves and found materials. ADDITIONAL INFO

Indigenous Land by Atieno Nyar Kasagam

Short film. VIDEO LINK

Wounds Many/Spotted Eagle by Keith Secola

 

Wall-mounted large scale screenprints on found book covers.

An Aberrational Poetics: Inside Me an Island Shaped W/hole by Lehua Taitano & Lisa Jarrett

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Participatory installation with organic vegetable seedlings. ADDITIONAL INFO

Making the Disposable Sacred by Natani Notah

 

Dust masks with indigenous beadwork. ADDITIONAL INFO

Illicit Family Tree Ring by Seneca Kern & Natasha Tamate Weiss

 

Bureau of objects and accompanying writings. ADDITIONAL INFO

Submission Guidelines

WHO CAN SUBMIT

We appreciate creative works from anyone* who feels this connection to explore – the intersection of the indigenous and the urban; the discourse on cultural disintegration/reintegration under imperialism; & how unifying within and across tribal identities can empower communities of color. We hope you can encourage the greater community around you to submit as well. For this call for submissions, we are only seeking performance-based works.

*(QT)POC artists especially those native to Turtle Island and Oceania are encouraged to apply. You may choose to submit anonymously as well.

WHAT TO SUBMIT

Calling for submissions of any performance medium (dance, music, spoken word, etc.)

Please include a short description of your performance piece (300 words max) and relevant media that will be used:

  • POEM : mp3 recording & pdf of poem
  • DANCE : mp3 of track (title & artist) & video
  • SONG/MUSIC : mp3 recording & pdf of lyrics

We ask that submissions/performance pieces are kept to a maximum of 15 minutes long. If your piece goes beyond the time frame, please include in your description/proposal with why you will need extra time. For musical performances, there is no limit to your set list as long as it follows the 15 minute rule (about 3-4 songs).

HOW TO SUBMIT

  1. Send one e-mail per submission to uxi.curatorial@gmail.com
  2. Format the subject line as follows:

Last Name – First Name – Title of Piece – Medium (eg. dance, spoken word, rap)

ex: Dizon – Sammay – Unite the Tribes – Dance Performance

  1. Please include the following information:
  • Name, Email, Phone, Mailing Address
  • Brief 50-word artist biography
  • If applicable, which Featured Conversation does your performance respond to?
  • For anonymous submissions, please include an asterisk (*) next to your name.
  • Any additional info about your piece
  • Which of June 16, 2018 and June 17, 2018 are you available to perform?

Although we are unable to offer honorariums for artists, UxI is happy to provide non-fiscal support for those who will perform at “Unite the Tribes.” Artists will be integrated in UxI’s marketing strategy, being featured on our social media and in newsletters. We will also provide documentation of performance (photo & video), and 2 complimentary festival passes (Saturday & Sunday).

Our team is so excited to listen, view, and experience your powerful performances. We look forward to reviewing your submissions!

SEND IN SUBMISSIONS BY MARCH 5, 2018

All Love,

UxI

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Workshop Recap: Before “the Beginning” -Decolonizing Storytelling

(SAN FRANCISCO, CA) On November 19, 2017, we gathered at the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts (MCCLA) in the heart of the Mission for our first workshop “Before the Beginning”: Decolonizing Storytelling.

The workshop was led by friend of UxI, Ras K’Dee – a Native California Pomo/African musician, community educator, and cofounder of multimedia arts youth empowerment organization Seventh Native American Generation (SNAG). The mission for the day was to engage with a decolonized notion of “The Beginning,” redefining our concept of history to exist outside the white narrative embedded in our post-colonial society, through exploring the language and story of the original peoples of this land.  We also set out to discuss the ways colonization overtly and covertly creates a dominant narrative, and the ways we can challenge this by giving voice to our own stories , and those of our ancestors, to heal our language and traditions.

The day was a montage of language learning, movement, self-reflection, discussion, and storytelling. Ras began the workshop by teaching us words from his indigenous language, accompanied by movements used to help the youth learn these words for the first time. As it turns out, reflecting on the ways we learned during our youth could be the key to understanding how we can better educate the next generation with narratives that include our own. Ras shared stories about his experiences in elementary school, feeling pulled apart by the Thanksgiving narrative of Native Americans taught within schools, and the truth he knew to be of his own culture. The language exercise also taught us to notice the connections between languages of different cultures, inspiring us to think deeper about how we are inherently all connected to each other and to this world.

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The workshop was also a mix of group dialogue, writing exercises, and shared reflection centered around the idea of how stories define us, define our culture, and define the world. But who is it that has the power to control this act of defining? How do we reclaim these definitions? In one exercise, we each listed all the things we would like to see change – either in the world, or within ourselves. We then took each item, and proposed how we would like to transform to world/ourselves and actualize these changes. Storytelling isn’t just talk – it is preservation of self, of culture, and it is actionable and revolutionary.

A special thanks to everyone who was in attendance! It was a heartwarming experience to be surrounded by a dynamic group of UxI friends, new faces, community members, students, elders, leaders, and storytellers. We would especially like to thank our host, the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts, for sharing their beautiful space of art and and intention with us. And last, but certainly not least, thank you to Ras K’Dee for facilitating this workshop, and inspiring/educating us with his stories.

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“Before the Beginning”: Decolonizing Storytelling was the first workshop of our workshop series, to be continued in 2018! Follow us online to stay up to date with all future UxI events!

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UxI: Unite the Tribes: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

Plain text view can be found below.

UxI - UniteTheTribes - VisArts CFS v2UxI - UniteTheTribes - VisArts CFS v22

Calling all visual artists! From paintings, to photography, to installations — we are looking for submissions to fill the SOMArts Bay Gallery for URBAN x INDIGENOUS IV. We are currently accepting visual and literary submissions only (performance submissions will be open in January 2018).

UxI IV: Unite the Tribes seeks to re-commune, reconnect, and reorganize our urban indigenous family.  Across the globe, the hxstory of imperialism has displaced indigenous communities, exploiting their sacred lands for resources and labor.  In our urban environment, we continue to bear witness to the separation and displacement of communities of color through forces such as gentrification.  Plagued by politicians who preach divisiveness, we now, more than ever, must (re)unite in strength and resilience. As UxI enters our fourth year, we seek art that challenges the forces that attempt to divide us, that speaks to the power of uniting in the face of adversity. How do we reclaim our belonging to our lands, to our ancestors, and to each other? How do we use art to shift our urban environments towards collective wellness and ensure our movements are rooted in fullest, most whole expressions of our being? How do we unite across the borders that have been created for us to re-envision how we live together, how we resist together, and how we shape the future for our generations yet to come? Can we achieve a way of solidarity that still embraces our differences?

Submissions that best reflect the spirit of “Unite the Tribes” will be selected as our Featured Conversations.  A separate call for performance submissions will be released in in January 2018, and artists will be prompted to respond to and/or engage with the Featured Conversations through their performance. By creating a space for engagement between art and artists of different mediums, UxI IV will be a space that evolves creative expression into critical dialogue.

Submission guidelines

WHO CAN SUBMIT

We appreciate creative works from anyone* who feels this connection to explore – the intersection of the indigenous and the urban; the discourse on cultural disintegration/reintegration under imperialism; & how unifying within and across tribal identities can empower communities of color. We hope you can encourage the greater community around you to submit as well. For this call for submissions, we are prioritizing visual and multimedia works. Submissions for performance pieces will be opened at a later date.

*(QT)POC artists especially of Asian, Pacific Islander, or Pilipinx descent are encouraged to apply. You may choose to submit anonymously as well.

WHAT TO SUBMIT

Calling for submissions of any visual/literary medium (paintings, photography, prints, film, installations, etc.)

  • Visual prints/slides by email attachment (at least 300 dpi).
  • Installation by email attachment of proposal, dimensions, images and materials list
  • Literature by email attachment (pdf format)
  • Film/Animation by MOV format (10 min max)

HOW TO SUBMIT

1. Send one e-mail per submission to uxi.curatorial@gmail.com

2. Format the subject line as follows:

Last Name – First Name – Title of Piece – Medium (painting, video, installation, eg.)

ex: Dizon – Sammay – Unite the Tribes – Short Film

3. Please include the following information:

  • Name, Email, Phone, Mailing Address
  • Type of piece / medium used / dimensions
  • Brief 50-word artist biography
  • For anonymous submissions, please include an asterisk (*) next to your name.
  • Any additional info about your piece
  • If you are available to install on June 15, 2018 and take down on June 17, 2018?
  • If you are not able to install/take down, how will we receive your piece?

SEND IN SUBMISSIONS BY JANUARY 1, 2018

One Love,

UxI

 

UxI Dream Team digs in at The NEST

During our Dream Team retreat last month, we had the honor of visiting The NEST Community Arts Center. Currently in it’s early building stages, The NEST will soon be the first ever sustainably built & Indigenous led community arts center in California.

Upon our arrival at The NEST, our Dream Team joined Ras K’dee (NEST and SNAG Magazine founder) for a replenishing, home-cooked meal (courtesy of our very own Baltazar Dasalla).

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For dessert, we indulged in a session of reflection, conversation, and healing. Stories were shared, songs were offered, and good vibes were exchanged.

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Afterwards, it was our pleasure to get some good work in as we dug into the Earth and help lay the foundation for The NEST’s future structure.

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The UxI Dream Team would like to thank our dear friend Ras K’dee for hosting us at The NEST, for sharing with us a space of healing, creativity, learning, and good vibes, and for helping us dig deep in more ways than one.

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VISIT THE NEST: http://www.nestbuildcreate.com/

Urban x Indigenous: Dream Team Retreat

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Earlier this year, Urban x Indigenous: III “Keep Pushin’” aimed to explore the ways in which marginalized peoples push to uplift and resist through the expression of Hip-Hop.  We were inspired by the strength exhibited in the unique stories and experiences shared by artists of different backgrounds at UxI: III. However, during these times of intensified tension in today’s societal climate, every mover, shaker, and creator cannot stand alone in the face of the oppressor.  Now more than ever, it is of critical importance that we combine the strength of many voices to construct one powerful, multi-faceted, multi-cultural, yet collective message.  This need for allied action called upon us to embark on UxI’s latest mission – to Unite the Tribes.

Though UxI: IV “Unite the Tribes” lies eight months away (mark your calendars for June 15 – 17, 2018!), our dream team’s visioning process began on the weekend of September 23 – 24, during UxI’s first ever retreat. Our dream team set off for a weekend of reflection, productivity and dialogue.

Re(calling) Our Ancestors

The weekend began in the home of Leny Mendoza Strobel – elder, thought-leader, wisdom-keeper, and (for which we are eternally grateful) our mentor. Ate Leny, known to many for her work through the Center for Babaylan Studies and as well as published academic work, facilitated our dream team’s thought process as we reflected on the definition of “Unite the Tribe.” She gathered us around an altar of sacred objects, and asked each of us to invite an ancestor into our thought circle.  In order to move forward, Ate Leny reminded us of the importance of looking back. In calling upon our ancestors and remembering their legacy, we began to create a vision for the medicine we hope UxI IV will be for our united communities.

Digging Deep

The following day, our dream team made our way to meet Ras K’dee at The NEST, which, after the completion of its construction, will be the first ever sustainable Indigenous-led arts center in California, a space and resource for future generations to harness.  The NEST’s official website welcomes you with a simple invitation, “This is a space for healing, good vibes, and creation of art. If you’re about that life, slide thru.”  Needless to say, we slid thru.  Following a shared breakfast around a sacred fire, Ras offered us song and thought as we further contemplated our connection to land, and the land’s claim to its indigenous peoples.  

To help with The NEST’s construction process, the dream team laced into our work boots, grabbed a few shovels, and got down to work.  The mission of the day was to dig up a section of the property to level the land for what will be the foundation of The NEST’s main building.  After shovel upon shovel, we stumbled upon a thick tree root that needed to be excavated.  We took turns working and pulling at the root, it’s strength requiring us to muster up our own in order to complete our mission.  It was as if the land was reminding us that we must dig deep and connect to our roots, so that we can lay the foundation for future generations.

Story Time

For our third and final location of the weekend retreat, the dream team made our way to Bindlestiff Studio, where we met up with Melanie Elvena, Artistic Director at the Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Center.  Our group dialogue functioned as a process of weaving together the moments and stories of the weekend, into a cohesive, actionable vision. Additionally, we used this space and time for a couple of our dream team members to facilitate group activities.  In one activity, we meditated upon the sensory memory of our pasts.  In another, we flexed our creative muscles to construct the story of ourselves told through the storytelling conventions of mythology. Sharing the story of ourselves seemed to be the perfect way to wrap up the story of our weekend, and begin the story of UxI IV.

In what was essentially a 24-hour retreat, our dream team managed to absorb and exchange a lifetime of learnings. Escaping our individual lives for a weekend of collective reflection was a necessary step in uniting our team, our thoughts and our vision.  Over the next eight months, the takeaways from this weekend with our mentors and friends will will carry us towards our mission to Unite the Tribes.

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UxI: Keep Pushin’: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

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Calling all artists! We are looking for submissions to fill our gallery up with artful stories, images, media, and performances! We invite you….

UxI: III “Keep Pushin'” envisions Hip-Hop as our thread from Urban to Indigenous. Throughout hxstory, marginalized peoples have always produced culture as a means to uplift and resist. Art invites the oppressed to imagine the world beyond what is and envision what can be. As UxI enters its third year, we continue to seek what pushes us to create in times of socio-political tension. How have movements created by people of color, particularly Hip Hop, strengthened us? How do our artistic practices honor ancestral lineage and become expressions of bodymindspirit ? In a movement where expression is as diverse as those who practice it, how has Hip Hop become a subversive voice for the oppressed? Lastly, how do we use Hip Hop as a way of pushing societal and artistic boundaries?

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

***DEADLINE WEDNESDAY APRIL 19***

i. who can submit

We appreciate creative works from anyone* who feels this connection to explore – the intersection of the indigenous and the urban; the discourse on injustice and intergenerational trauma through Hip Hop; & how Hip Hop can be a unifying thread of the oppressed. We hope you can encourage the greater community around you to submit as well. Though we are prioritizing visual and multimedia works, we are interested in all types of artistic submissions that speak to the theme of URBAN x INDIGENOUS: KEEP PUSHIN’

*(QT)POC artists especially of Asian, Pacific Islander, or Pilipinx descent are encouraged to apply. You may choose to submit anonymously as well.

ii. what to submit

Calling for submissions of any medium – from prose to poetry to photography to artwork and performance:

Literature by email attachment (pdf format)
Visual prints/slides by email attachment (at least 300 dpi).
Installation by email attachment of proposal, dimensions, images and materials list
Film/Animation by avi format (10 min max)
Performance* by email attachment

*please provide a short description of your performance piece (300 words max) and relevant media that will be used:

POEM : mp3 recording & pdf of poem
DANCE : mp3 of track (title & artist) & video
SONG/MUSIC : mp3 recording & pdf of lyrics

iii. how to submit

1. Send one e-mail per submission to urbanxindigenous@gmail.com

2. Format the subject line as follows: Last Name – First Name – Title of Piece – Medium (e.g., poetry, prose, visual, etc.) ex: Dizon – Sammay – Keep Pushin’ – Performance Installation

3. Please include the following information: * Name, Email, Phone, Mailing Address

* Type of piece / medium used / dimensions
* Brief 50-word artist biography
* For anonymous submissions, please include an asterisk (*) next to your name.
* Any additional info about your piece
* If you are available to install/take down on June 11th?
* If you are not able to install/take down, how will we receive your piece?

 

Send in your submissions!
One Love,

UxI